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SQL vs T-SQL(Sybase)

2 posts in General Discussion Last posting was on 2012-11-29 16:00:24.0Z
M.Karthikeyan Posted on 2012-11-29 09:45:39.0Z
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From: M.KARTHIKEYAN
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Subject: SQL vs T-SQL(Sybase)
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ALL,

What is the difference between SQL and T-SQL (Sybase) ? It
could be a too masic question. But i have recently readed
the below blog and saw T-SQL(Microsoft). Thats why is there
any difference between T-SQL(Microsoft) vs T-SQL(Sybase).
Obviously..But i don't want to go into that now.

http://blog-mstechnology.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/difference-between-sql-vs-t-sql.html

my question is,

Difference between SQL vs T-SQL(Sybase)


Bret Halford Posted on 2012-11-29 16:00:24.0Z
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On 11/29/2012 2:45 AM, M.KARTHIKEYAN wrote:
> ALL,
>
> What is the difference between SQL and T-SQL (Sybase) ? It
> could be a too masic question. But i have recently readed
> the below blog and saw T-SQL(Microsoft). Thats why is there
> any difference between T-SQL(Microsoft) vs T-SQL(Sybase).
> Obviously..But i don't want to go into that now.
>
> http://blog-mstechnology.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/difference-between-sql-vs-t-sql.html
>
> my question is,
>
> Difference between SQL vs T-SQL(Sybase)
>

The answer is essentially the same as from that link
SQL is an abstract concept, an abstract query langauge.
T-SQL is Sybase's implementation of SQL, much as PL/SQL is
Oracle's implementation of SQL and "Informix SQL" was Informix's
implementation.

(there is also a somewhat different T-SQL from Microsoft; it
has the same roots - some 20 years ago it was the same thing,
but Sybase and Microsoft then parted ways)

Both SQL and T-SQL have changed over time and continue to evolve.

Some new features are first thought up and implemented
by vendors before a standard syntax is determined by ANSI
(the vendors certainly don't want to wait if customers are demanding
functionality not covered by the existing standard).
Some vendor-implemented features ANSI never will incorporate.
Some features thought up by other parties, perhaps being standardized
by ANSI, will be implemented by vendors before the standard
is finalized and so the syntax may or may not match the final
standard. In other cases, some ANSI features won't be implemented
until after they are standardized, and some ANSI features never
will be implemented if the vendors don't see any commercial
demand for the feature.

To support their customers, vendors generally won't stop supporting
the syntax they originally implemented even if the ANSI standard
settles on something somewhat differently, though additional support
may be added to also support the new ANSI definition.
(TSQL, for instance, supports both the older *= outer join syntax
and the newer LEFT OUTER JOIN syntax - we didn't make customers
rewrite all their application code when we started supporting
the new ANSI syntax).